Building RPA at Helsinki University Hospital (HUS): Discussion with Minna Pekkala, Head of Robotics

Finland’s largest Hospital District, HUS – The Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa – is a joint authority formed by 24 municipalities. Functioning as part of HUS, Helsinki University Hospital (HUH) is nationally responsible for treating severe and rare illnesses and ones calling for special expertise and technology. HUS hospitals employ over 24,000 professionals in 23 locations and received a total of 2,6 million patient visits in 2017.

 

Summary of webinar with Minna Pekkala, Head of Robotics at Helsinki University Hospital (HUS)

How are digital workers delivered at HUS?

“HUS’s digital workers are delivered as a service (by Digital Workforce). This means we don’t have to buy our own licenses or servers, manage or update hardware, or worry about scalability. We think that the cost of service is predictable, and believe this can help us be cost-effective. We use service delivered from Azure cloud and Blue Prism (Robotic Process Automation, RPA) technology. We had already tested the technology over 2 years ago when we had our Proof-of-Concept.”

How is Robotic Process Automation managed?

“Because we are a large organisation we wanted to make sure that the project management wouldn’t be split in different units. That is why our (RPA) management is centralised in our IT management. Our duty is to make implementation possible and offer RPA development across the organisation.”

“We hit ‘go’ 7-8 months ago. With RPA, we want to help our employees automate routine processes and allocate more time to actual patient care.”

How do you choose processes for automation? 

“When we choose potential processes to automate we put weight on cost savings: How much is the work going to cost and what is the actual return on investment?”

“We have also required that the workflow can be copied. This means that the same process can be run in several different units. And of course, in our operating environment we always think about patient safety and customer quality.”

What has been done so far?

“At the moment we have two different processes in production and four more will follow soon. All in all, we have identified more than 50 potential processes and already 13 of those are in building.”

“Examples of our pilot processes include:

1) RADU-referrals: These radiology request forms are currently working in two different units, but we have 30 locations where the process can be copied.

2) Virtual referrals: Our hospital gets over 300 000 referrals a year. RPA is in operation at 6 locations doing classification, transfer and handling of referrals. If you think about scalability, we have still 37 more units where we can help with receiving referrals and redirecting them to specialists (by expanding the automation). We can use Machine Learning to help classify referrals.”

What have you learned?

“It’s not possible to communicate too much – to deploy RPA you have to concentrate on change management! Few people really know what Robotic Process Automation is and it raises questions among employees and management. People may be afraid of replacement so you need to commit management. The message of why we use RPA must come from line managers. Change often happens slowly in large organisations. There many parties and actors and everyone has their own opinion. You also can’t forget IT – without IT you can’t bring technology to use.”

“Then processes you are going to automate: Who owns them, who knows them best, who can give permission for (RPA) production? Does the process need changes to be automated with RPA? “

“Finally, you have robots, the users. Robots need identity. They have user access, but the robots are not human individuals and in certain systems it may cause problems. Robots can’t learn new system features without their model of work being updated. RPA updates must be synchronised with system changes.”

“RPA is not the final step. You must be ready to think about other options and possibilities as well. For example, RPA with Machine Learning can be very productive.”

Do you have a steering group for RPA?

“We do have a steering group. We have a head doctor who is responsible for clinical processes, a person from our administrative unit and two managers from IT management. We decide priorities, cost locations and project funding.”

“In my opinion, it is important that we have people involved from different sides of our organisation because we need to consider the benefits of the whole hospital.”

What expertise do u need to operate robotics in large scale?

“We buy software as a service (from Digital Workforce) and we do have a Centre of Excellence, but at the moment its only me. In the future, I would like us to have a project manager and perhaps a technical architect is also needed.”

What is your target for next year? How many processes will you automate?

“At least 50. But we would like closer to 100. Cost efficiency grows with scaling up.”

What do you think are the greatest obstacles when starting with RPA?

“It’s a lot of work to build the service up, I would recommend having a project manager for running tasks. In general, it’s good to have more hands and heads put together.”

 

Want to learn more? Listen to the complete webinar recording here

 

The Finnish Tax Administration selects Digital Workforce as its software robotics supplier

Digital Workforce has signed a service agreement with the Finnish Tax Administration to provide the organization with an extensive RPA-platform (Robotic Process Automation). The acquisition covers the licensing and delivery of software robots, solution training, support, maintenance and expert services. The RPA-platform is utilized across the entire Tax Administration.

The use of software robotics to automate the Tax Administration’s work processes has been investigated and tested since 2015. Through these investigations, the Tax Administration has identified RPA business benefits that include: reduction of costs and errors, more harmonized operations, inter-system integrations and increased process speed. All the identified benefits support the Tax administration’s strategic goals and translate into improvements in customer service.

As an Intelligent Process Automation (IPA) service provider, Digital Workforce has the flexibility to complement the capabilities of its software robots by extending its services – according to its customers’ needs – to cover other intelligent technologies.

How is Intelligent Process Automation (IPA) changing business – a reflection by Professor Leslie Willcocks

Digitalization, robotization and artificial intelligence have become business buzzwords, frequently brought up during conferences and board meetings. How does the reality of a modern enterprise look? Are companies ready to embrace the potential presented by new intelligent technologies?

Two years after our first exclusive interview with Professor Willcocks of London School of Economics and Political Science, one of the most respected experts in the field of knowledge work automation, Digital Workforce had the opportunity to reunite with him, this time in London. Reflecting on what has changed over the past two years and looking ahead at the future of RPA (Robotic Process Automation) and other intelligent technologies, the discussion tackled some burning challenges companies face when implementing these solutions, how they currently stand with regards to knowledge work automation and how they should measure success.

How far have we gotten over the past two years in terms of technology and how managers see RPA?

RPA has gotten a much higher profile than it had two years ago, the technology has to some extent improved, in the sense of being more enterprise reliable than before. There are different, more sophisticated and highly customizable tools available now, solutions that are more scalable than others, but the underlying technology has not changed that much.

Business people have looked at RPA and realized they have to invest in it, due to its potential economic value. However, all managers have not come to this realization at once – we have observed three distinctive waves, implementing the technologies due to different motives. The first wave was a rather limited amount of relatively mature businesses who saw the value of RPA right up front. The second wave came in 2016, when a larger number of companies started investing heavily in process automation. Finally, the third wave started in early 2017, induced by heavily intensified marketing activities of RPA solution providers, and this enhanced visibility has been since than pushing companies to board the RPA train as well.

“RPA used to be sold as a “quick win”, easily adoptable and relatively cheap tool that would give you cost savings and a quick ROI – but people have now started to realize that it is rather a strategic weapon.” – Professor Leslie Willcocks of the LSE

Moreover, some risks have emerged that were not obvious two years ago. With regards to the main challenges RPA brings to businesses, only about 25% are directly related to technologies. The remaining 75% is about not managing it as a strategic project. Companies tend to neglect aspects such as good governance, quickly available resources, getting the C-suite on board, treating it as both a change management as well as a technical issue. There is a large number of steps the management should take and action principles that should be followed in order to reduce these risks.

What do you see as the major challenge for companies implementing knowledge work automation?

For sure, the biggest challenge is that companies are still not treating this strategically enough. They underestimate what they can achieve with it – something called a triple win, consisting of enhanced shareholder value, customer value and employee value. Their ambitions oftentimes do not aim high enough.

In the case of RPA – they are partially stuck with looking at it as a tactical tool rather than a strategic weapon, as a discrete tool rather than a potential uniting platform, as a software implementation and not as a change in the work processes. Ultimately, companies often miss on the real business value with RPA projects by this mistake. Looking for a quick ROI and hard business numbers to prove the added value while not factoring in that the main benefits might be unanticipated, such as improved customer experience and working morale of the employees, is the biggest mistake many modern enterprises make.

On top of that, cognitive automation has not yet taken off and is still at a promising, relatively immature stage. Some firms are implementing discrete uses of cognitive automation, which bring them real business value and progress. It seems so that the true synergies will arise from linking RPA with cognitive automation, eventually creating a platform that integrates seamlessly with other digital technologies in place.

Is this strategic approach towards RPA a necessary step on the way towards the implementation of cognitive automation and platform building?

Indeed, where RPA rests within the organization signals whether the company sees it as strategic or not. If you create a centralized center of excellence and you have senior executives involved in it, it is pretty clearly of a strategic interest. On the other hand, if you treat it as a lower level tool that you would apply increasingly across the organization, it seems to be more of a tactical approach without a sense of direction. The potential of RPA in relationship to cognitive automation is immense and the different automation technologies should be recognized as complementary pieces of a whole.

What is the most exciting development that you have seen in this field recently?

Lots of the cognitive automation technologies are truly exciting, carrying a massive promise. Once companies start combining them, they can get to an impressive level of automation, almost end-to-end in some cases, pushing the potential uses of the increasingly available technologies further.

Do you think that the organizational maturity is not necessarily there yet?

Mostly, the maturity of organizations with regards to their ability to absorb this level of change is not high enough yet. Companies are absorbed with way too many other IT problems and issues related to managing operations. This leaves them in a place where they are not ready to absorb even more technological change. As a result, learning to integrate the new advanced solutions is being postponed because people are still learning how to fit the previous ones into their businesses and to drive business value out of them.

How do you think the success of RPA and these first AI activities should be measured?

In some ways, measuring this presents the same problems as evaluating a success of an IT investment. There are some obvious costs and service improvement measures – you can reduce costs while offering a much superior service, the degree to which the automation does that is one of them. There is also a range of softer yet crucial benefits – such as customer experience that could be expressed by a plenty of measures. Especially in regulated industries, these solutions could help the companies to quickly and accurately comply with the imposed regulations, providing relatively cheap trial opportunities, compared to how would the companies do it without automation. Another set of metrics could revolve around employees – level of satisfaction, of morale, of productivity with machines as opposed to productivity without them and what the human beings bring to that combination. Last but not least, metrics around the level of innovation are also interesting – is the company innovating more in products and services?

What do you expect to happen in the upcoming two years?

I would expect to see a lot more RPA use-cases showing how they fit with cognitive automation, bringing lots of business value. Additionally, cognitive tools would improve on certain fronts – not the machine learning or the algorithms behind them, these are already advanced. Rather, image and data processing together with natural language processing is going to improve greatly, integrating the enhanced productivity and performance.

 

Leslie Willcocks, a professor of London School of Economics and Political Science, is considered one of the world’s most respected researchers, speakers and business publications writers in the field of knowledge work automation.

Professor Willcocks held the closing keynote at this year’s Blue Prism World event in London. You can check out the highlights of his speech titled “Robotic process automation 2018: Now, Soon, Later” here.

Our journey and motivations to increase the intelligence of virtual workers – A reflection by Digital Workforce Head of AI, Gaurav Khullar

Recently, I’ve been devouring myself into critically thinking about innovation. Can there be a scientific framework for creating innovation and using it for the prosperity of businesses and humanity? Or does innovation happen due to random sparks of brilliance and ingenuity of the human brain. Whatever the reason, one thing is clear: Only innovation that results from solving someone’s need or want and is packaged at the right price will prosper.

There has been a lot of hullabaloo around Artificial Intelligence in the recent past and the fire has been further fuelled by media reports about spectacular AI achievements e.g. Deepmind’s AlphaGo, Microsoft’s machine translation reaching levels of human performance and many others. Sceptics or rationalists (as they may like to call themselves) would rather question the impact that such AI will have on humanity. Believers, on the other hand, would like to believe that AI will one day become a superpower.

For an organization like Digital Workforce, the goal is to create AI that will always empower humans rather than overpower them. Humans will be empowered if AI can help them in: a) making decisions that are unbiased and objective and require a lot of computation and data mining that is unwieldy for a human b) getting more satisfaction from their jobs by automating their routine tasks so that they can focus on more creative tasks.

Automation of routine tasks has been possible for many years by using automation scripts. However, more elaborate and industrialized commercial software have started to appear since the last couple of years. These software applications have gained the name of Robotic Process Automation (RPA). The RPA applications have not been as glorified as ML, but they have been providing a lot of value and the RPA industry is expected to be in multi-billion USD range by 2021.

What is especially interesting for me as an AI practitioner is the convergence of ML/AI and RPA. RPA robots have the limitations that the business rules have to be manually pre-programmed and they can only process structured digital data. They can therefore only automate a fraction of business processes where the format of digital data is structured and pre-defined. Also, these robots are not good learners – they don’t have the “digital brain” to learn patterns and rules from data. That said, their strength is that they can work with any existing IT application which means that cost of automation using RPA is minimal. RPA software also has the capability to integrate with AI components using REST API calls – this capability is a huge enabler to use AI as the brain and RPA agents as the hands to execute business processes.

The limitations of RPA no longer hold it back as integrated AI models can understand and process unstructured and unformatted data for it (including in non-digital format e.g. text in paper documents). Such a capability is termed as Intelligent Process Automation (IPA). The IPA market is an order of magnitude larger than the RPA market.

We at Digital Workforce are on a journey to create an IPA platform – a digital brain force for our RPA agents so that they can automate tasks requiring higher order of “brain” function. Hopefully, this will unlock a tremendous amount of business value which can be reinvested to develop more meaningful and innovative experiences. Our hope is that our innovation will fuel and empower corporations to further their own innovativeness.

Would you like to join us on the journey? We are growing our AI team! Find out more here.

 

Gaurav is responsible for defining, developing and delivering Digital Workforce’s AI strategy. He joined Digital Workforce from a Senior Manager & AI Lead for Data Science role at Accenture. He has strong experience in AI, e.g. context aware computing, personalised customer experience, churn prediction, econometric forecasting and predictive maintenance, gained from his previous positions at Nokia, Microsoft, Tecnotree, Accenture and a few co-founded start-ups. He has worked with technologies like Machine Learning, Natural Language Processing, Recommendation Systems and Deep Learning.

Contact: Gaurav Khullar Head of AI, Digital Workforce, +358 50 482 1216 gaurav.khullar@digitalworkforce.fi

Want to learn more about the latest developments in AI and how intelligent solutions can benefit your business? Gaurav hosts a monthly expert interview webinar series. Access all interviews free on ai.digitalworkforce.eu 

Workforce Management: Manage your virtual workforce real-time where ever you are!

Digital Workforce has developed its own mobile and desktop application to improve the management and result reporting of RPA based digital workforce. The Workforce Management application is already in test use and is soon made available for all Digital Workforce cloud service customers as part of the Robot-as-a-Service package.

The idea for Workforce Management originated from a customer survey that mapped customers’ wishes and needs in managing their digital workforce. The survey highlighted that organizations wanted an easily accessible and real-time channel for tracking their digital workers. The wish was motivated by the desire to attain general peace of mind, control and the ability to further develop operations.

Traditional applications offered only limited tools for monitoring and management and didn’t correspond well with the customers’ needs who wanted to know exactly what their robots had done and whether everything went as planned. The first application version of Workforce Management was quickly created and further developed in co-operation with Digital Workforce customers.

Digital Workforce developed the application for the BP platform to perform searches and present the information in a user-friendly format. Using Workforce Management, the customer organization’s admins are able to check the status, reports and performance of their robotic workforce at any time on a computer or mobile device. The application is also security-audited in May 2018.

The easy-to-use visual application integrates the management of digital workforce to the everyday life of the business and brings them better in touch with their virtual resources. In addition, the application helps the business management to further develop their use of digital workers and to identify new opportunities for their use.

Automation super week: Sign up for our September events across the Nordics!

The fall kicks off in the Nordics with a busy week of events. Digital Workforce organizes a total of 4 breakfast seminars in Norway, Denmark and Sweden. If you want to stay updated on the latest news and developments in process automation, software robotics and new intelligent technologies these seminars are for you! Check out our upcoming events below and register for your local event today.

Events in Denmark:

12.9. Copenhagen

Organized in collaboration with UiPath, the event’s list of speakers includes UiPath’s Technical Customer Success Director Rasvan Constantinescu along side Digital Workforce’s own representatives Jari Annala and Tony Minana. Customer presentation is held by Topdanmark Forsikring’s Senior Project Manager of RPA and Machine Learning Stig Geer Pedersen.

The presentations answer questions such as:

– How can you get the best results from RPA?
– How RPA can be used in different industries and business functions?
– How should you prepare for new intelligent technologies?

You will also have the opportunity to ask your own questions and network during the breakfast.

The event takes place at Scandic Copenhagen on Wednesday September 12th, 8.30-11.00 (CEST). Register free!

13.9. Aarhus

Denmark’s second breakfast seminar is also organized together with UiPath and both parties deliver their expers from Copenhagen to Aarhus. Jari Annala and Tony Minanan of Digital Workforce discuss the latest developments in the field of RPA and AI with UiPath’s Technical Customer Success Director Rasvan Constantinescu. The event will be held in an intimate setting to encourage more personal encounters and open discussion.

The presentations answer questions such as:

– What should you know about RPA best practices and success measures?
– How can organizations tap into the benefits of RPA in all fields and fuctions?
– What should you do now to be ready for the future involving intelligent technologies?

The event offers a great opportunity to address your burning questions and get personal advice from the industry’s leading experts .

The event takes place at Scandic Aarhus on Thursday September 13th, 8.30-11.00 (CEST). Register free!

Events in Norway:

13.9. Kristiansand

Digital Workforce holds an intimate breakfast seminar in Kristiansand, Norway to address questions often brought up by organizations starting their robotic journey. Presentations are held by Digital Workforce’s Norwegian team – the leading Intelligent Process Automation service providers in the country.

The speakers answer questions like:

– How can you identify the potential for RPA and other intelligent solutions in your organization?
– How can virtual workers accelerate digital transformation?
– What are the steps from introduction to long term success in implementing virtual workforce?

The event offers a great opportunity to address your burning questions and get personal advice from the industry’s leading experts .

The event takes place at Scandic Kristiansand on Thursday September 13th, 9.00-11.00 (CEST). Register free!

Events in Sweden:

13.9. Stockholm

Our largest event is held in Stockholm, Sweden. The opening speaker Kenneth Tellebo, Digital Workforce Sweden’s Country Manager is followed by a customer case presentation by PwC. Marcus Henriksson, PwC’s Head of AI and Automation tells about the company’s journey from a pre-study to implementing digital employees and how this transformed their business.

The presentations discuss topics such as:

– What’s the state of RPA in Sweden today are where is it headed?
– How RPA and other intelligent technologies can be used to boost business performance?
– What are the keys to long term success?

You will also have the opportunity to ask your own questions and network during the breakfast.

The event takes place at Scandic Continental Stockholm on Thursday September 13th, 8.30-10.00 (CEST). Register free!

Digital Workforce and Digital Workforce Academy receive Blue Prism Innovation Awards

Blue Prism has selected Digital Workforce as it’s most innovative partner and the receiver of this year’s Partner Innovation Award. DWF Academy also received special recognision and the Most Innovative Use of Blue Prism Award. The awards were delivered at the Blue Prism World event in London.

Digital Workforce was selected as the winning partner due to its innovative use of Blue Prism technology in its services. The services recognized as grounds for the Partner Innovation Award include Digital Workforce’s cloud service, mobile service management, 24/7 process maintenance and quality assurance service, online training and repository component library for cloud customers.

DWF Academy was recognised with the Most Innovative Use of Blue Prism Award only 14 months after deploying its online training academy. DWF Academy is the only provider of a full spectrum of RPA-related topics for Blue Prism including how to develop complex, scalable and robust process automations globally. Helping students to gain real-world experience in automated processes with Blue Prism gives the courses a unique twist, and its students an invaluable experience.

For more information about the awards visit Blue Prism.

Digital Workforce Partners with UiPath to Offer Customers More Extensive Robotic Process Automation (RPA) Services from Cloud

Digital Workforce Partners with UiPath to Offer Customers More Extensive Robotic Process Automation (RPA) Services from Cloud

UiPath’s RPA solution to help Digital Workforce customers complete core operations more efficiently, accurately, securely and at scale

[May 29, 2018 LONDON & HELSINKI] – Digital Workforce, the leading robotics services company in the Nordics, today announced that it has partnered with UiPath, the leading enterprise Robotic Process Automation (RPA) software company, to further expand business and operations in the Nordics. In this partnership, which began in May, Digital Workforce offers UiPath technology for organizations that have selected UiPath as their RPA tool. UiPath’s enterprise grade RPA-solutions are now available across all Digital Workforce’s offices Finland, Sweden, Denmark, Norway and Poland.

The software robot revolution is going strong in the Nordic countries. The utilisation of RPA to get rid of manual knowledge work routines and free up people for more purposeful work has expanded from the financial sector to the public sector, municipalities, healthcare, industrial companies and retail. Most commonly robotics is used in functions, such as finance & accounting, operations and customer service.

Jukka Virkkunen, one of the co-founders and partners, at Digital Workforce, said, “Since the founding of Digital Workforce in 2015 we have seen the RPA market develop and mature in the Nordics. UiPath technology continues to evolve rapidly offering many unique benefits, such as specific solutions for front-end automation and free trials. Our services are based on the market-leading and robust technologies, and we are thrilled to now provide UiPath from our Digital Workforce industrialised robot as a service platform both on private cloud and Azure. Simultaneously with the cloud development, we have invested heavily in developing UiPath competence throughout our organization.

Digital Workforce has automated over 500 processes and is the market-leading robotics company in the Nordics. The company has a strong foothold in the financial sector and is now rapidly expanding its customer base in healthcare, public sector and other knowledge-intensive large organizations. Two dozen RPA professionals are currently in the final stage of UiPath certification, and the first customer agreements have already been signed.

Anand Nagwani, UiPath Vice President, EMEA, Partnerships, said: “The Nordic region is a key focus for UiPath as we continue to grow throughout Europe. In partnership with Digital Workforce, we will introduce more organizations to the power of RPA and to dramatically improve business productivity, compliance and customer service across back-office and front-office operations. Not only will our solutions help companies become digital businesses faster, it will also help them gain a valuable advantage on the path to AI.”

About Digital Workforce
Digital Workforce is the only company specialising in Intelligent Process Automation services on an industrial scale. Our intelligent digital workers automate knowledge work processes in large organizations freeing up the time of human employees for more valuable work. The deployment of digital workers requires no changes to the existing information systems. Digital Workforce was founded in the summer of 2015 and it currently employs over 150 IPA specialists in Finland, Sweden, Norway, Denmark and Poland. www.digitalworkforce.eu

About UiPath
Built for both business and IT, UiPath is the leading platform for enterprise Robotic Process Automation (RPA). More than 700 enterprise customers and government agencies use UiPath’s Enterprise RPA platform to rapidly deploy software robots that perfectly emulate and execute repetitive processes, boosting business productivity, ensuring compliance and enhancing customer experience across back-office and front-office operations.

With a thriving RPA developer community of more than 120,000 worldwide, UiPath is on a mission to democratize RPA and support a digital business revolution. Based in New York City, UiPath’s presence extends to 14 countries throughout North America, Europe and Asia. The company is backed by $183M in series A & B funding from Accel, CapitalG, Kleiner, Perkins, Caufield & Byers, Credo Ventures, Earlybird’s Digital East Fund and Seedcamp. UiPath’s Series B valuation exceeded $1 billion.

For more information, visit https://www.uipath.com.

Media contact: Digital Workforce
Jukka Virkkunen
Partner
+358 50 670 47
jukka.virkkunen@digitalworkforce.fi

Media Contact: UiPath
Simon Coughlin
Whiteoaks International
+44 (0) 1252 727313
Uipath@whiteoaks.co.uk

Digital Workforce selected as the strategic partner to Finland’s largest healthcare district: HUS prepares to ramp up the use of software robots to boost efficiency and service quality

Digital Workforce has been selected as the strategic partner to Finland’s largest healthcare district following a competitive bidding. Digital Workforce will deliver software robots to Helsinki and Uusimaa healthcare district (HUS) as a cloud service, which can also be used to automate CE-marked clinical processes. The estimated total value of the acquisition is up to 1 300 000 euros.

Digital Workforce’s cloud-based digital workers enable the safe and agile automation of both administrative and clinical processes at HUS. Aside from software robotics, new technologies such as Machine Learning and Artificial Intelligence (AI) may be introduced to grow the digital workers’ capabilities in the future.

Digital Workforce is Finland’s leading processes automation service provider in both private and public healthcare. In addition to HUS, the company delivers digital workers to multiple other Finnish healthcare operators such as Espoo, Istekki, 2 M-IT, Eksote and PSHP.

More information

Tiina Leivo, Head of Healthcare
Digital Workforce
+358 50 1928
tiina.leivo@digitalworkforce.fi

Digital Workforce appoints a Country Manager to its Polish office

Digital Workforce originally opened an office in Lodz to support its Nordic clients’ service centers in Poland. The team quickly grew with the lead of an experienced Office Manager Kinga Chelińska Barańska. Today, the over forty experts strong team has become increasingly independent and we are proud to introduce Kinga in her new role as the Polish Country Manager.

The woman in charge: Kinga Chelińska Barańska

Leading Digital Workforce‘s Polish office is a woman on a mission: Kinga Chelińska Barańska has set out to help Polish clients boost productivity and reduce their costs. She has over ten years of professional experience in the finance sector and is very familiar with the challenges large corporations in particularly face with managing the productivity of their computer-based processes.

Kinga joined Digital Workforce in 2017 when the Polish office was first established. During this time, and in the service of her past employers, she has successfully conducted business projects related to the creation and implementation of new systems, process migration and robotic process automation. As a Country Manager, Kinga is responsible for the Polish branch of Digital Workforce.

New growth from Poland

Digital Workforce originally opened the Lodz office to serve its Nordic clients that had set up their service centers in Poland. Lodz in particular was chosen as the office location because the local universities were known to grow and attract a large population of technologically skilled young professionals. Since the establishment of the Polish office in 2017 Digital Workforce has recruited over 40 professionals in Lodz and was awarded Top Scandinavian Investor by FDI Poland in 2017.

Despite the original set up, it was recognized early on that Poland posed an interesting business opportunity of its own. Many large banks, insurance companies, and BPOs – that are quickly developing and implementing solutions for process automation – operate in and around Lodz.

“One of DWF’s key differentiators is our ability to enable our clients to set and execute their global digital strategies by offering them standardised services. DWF partners have been quick to recognize the strategic value of intelligent process automation and our team has been trained to provide scalable service solutions based on best practices. Our clients rely on us to escort them to the New World and address challenges when needed”, Kinga says: “I’m excited to start my new role knowing that we have what it takes to help our clients on their digital journey!”

Contact information
Kinga Chelińska Barańska, Country Manager, Digital Workforce,
mobile +48 514 519 375,
kinga.chelinska-baranska@digitalworkforce.pl

Digital Workforce Poland
ŁÓDŹ 90-057
UL. SIENKIEWICZA 85/87